More Thoughts on Healthcare

The current state of healthcare isn’t literally about healthcare at all. It is about the enormous and continuing rise in the cost of healthcare due to the separation of healthcare consumer/patient and the entity that pays for the care, typically an HMO or the government. To give an example of “HMO-driven inflation,” before transferring my care to the Veterans Health Administration (VA), more than one of my providers had a “standard” rate at which they billed HMOs and presumably Medicare, and a second, significantly lower rate that they charged to individuals without health insurance or other third-party payer. I was shocked to find an example even within the VA. Under certain circumstances, such as lack of available bed or inability to provide a service in within a mandated time limit, the VA contracts with private healthcare providers to handle their overflow (at no cost to the veteran – the cost is billed directly to the VA). I had occasion to be treated by a private provider on behalf of the VA, and I came to learn that my care was billed to the VA at a rate that was TWENTY-FIVE PERCENT above the standard rate that was billed to HMOs or other payers. As shocking as that is, I suspect it’s more of an example of the government ironically being price-gouged because its needs are frequently immutable, rather than being a major contributor to “HMO inflation.”

The problem and its causes are no great mysteries. More important are solutions that avoid a massive new Federal government entitlement (when some major current programs are of questionable sustainability) and pricing healthcare out of reach of more Americans, straining non-profit hospitals by further turning the ER into a primary care clinic. I don’t advocate the abolition of HMOs, but I do propose doing away with absurdities like the “sky’s the limit” surgery in exchange for a $20 copay.  We need to look at reviving features of “traditional” 80/20 insurance (which has never gone away for small businesses or the self-employed), such as DEDUCTIBLES and a reasonable, realistic (for patient and provider) percentage match. Nothing onerous that would prevent a person from obtaining needed care, an amount sufficient, if only symbolically, to restore the patient/consumer’s awareness that increased consumption of medical resources costs proportionately more, a basic lesson of economics that seems to function normally until someone with a lab coat and stethoscope enters the picture.

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Published in: on 2009 08 16 at 01:25:12  Leave a Comment  
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